Kelsey Elder is an educator & typographer based in Providence, Rhode Island.


Selected Projects
Typeface
Personal
on-going

Meager 

Identity/Branding
Personal
2021

Second Shift Autowerks

Python/Programming
Teaching
2021

All Possible Arcs

Identity/Branding
Team
2021

Rise Strength

Programming/Motion
Personal
2020

Letter.matter

Exhibition/Lettering
Team
2019

Why Don’t You Carve Other Animals

Supergraphics
Personal
2019

Ameri-Candied Dreams

Exhibition/Lettering
Team
2019

Dead Bird Letters

Lettering
Personal
on-going

Greeting Cards


Archive
Lettering
Personal
on-going

Sketchbook + Outtakes

Branding/Experience
Personal
on-going

Lowered Values

Lettering
Personal
2022

Team Juice

Lettering
Personal
2021

Strong Boys Club

Identity/Branding
Personal
2021

Drinking Buddies

Lettering
Personal
2021

Pint-Sized Power

Programming/Web
Team
2020

A Wedding Website for Friends

Book Design
Team
2016

Simple Forms, Stunning Glazes

Supergraphic
Personal
2016

Fre$h Patina! (of Fool’s Gold)

Programming/Typeface
Personal
2016

Varnish

Sign/Supergraphic
Team
2016

Casualties & Casual Tees



↗︎  About + Bio  
↗︎  Contact

Mark


All Possible Arcs


python/drawbot
This series of gifs are exported from example scripts used to teach generative processes and variable design spaces. These were written in Python and executed by the opensource program for creative Python coding, DrawBot.

Students use iterative hand-coding on a variable coordinate grid to expose the mechanical processes behind how a computer draws visual form (type). Through a sequence of workshops and prompts, they then expand this to key programmatic concepts; like automation, randomization, looping & logic gates. The emphasis is on developing a process in which small variation can yield unexpected or generative surprise. 

In this example script math and combinatorics demonstrate the complexity of a variable design space. Grids have a 2n rule if the option for any given cell is on/off (or black white) where n = number of cells in the design space... When there are more than two options for any given cell, then grids have a Kn rule where K = number of variants. This has a 3x3 grid which is 29 positions. There are up to 4 variants in the example scripts. So, 4 to the power of 29 = 2.8823038e+17 possible forms (a lot!) but the unique combinations are likely not this high.

Links to the annotated .py scripts are available below.




↑ allPossibleArcs.py example script : here.

↑ allPossibleHalfCircles.py example script : here.


↑ all4PossibleShapes.py example script : here.


↑ allPossibleArcs.py example script : here.





Mark